Spanish and Italian

Websites: Spanish, Italian

The Department of Spanish and Italian offers a comprehensive program ranging from beginning to advanced courses in language, literature, and culture. Members of its faculty hail from the United States, Spain, and Latin America, speak with a variety of accents and dialectical variants, and conduct research in a broad range of geographical areas and time periods. The Department works closely with and contributes to other departments and interdisciplinary programs, such as International and Global Studies, Humanities, and Women's and Gender Studies.

Students will find opportunities to hear and speak Spanish and Italian outside the classroom: at the theme houses (see below), weekly Spanish table, monthly tertulia gatherings, and occasional events such as lectures and film screenings.

In the Italian program, language and culture are taught in a full-immersion, communicative classroom, where students can work toward gaining proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening over as many as four semesters of study. The fourth semester, ITAL 301, combines an advanced grammar review with a focused introduction to Italian literature. Italian studies are excellent preparation for students wishing to study in Italy, as well as for students pursuing studies in literature, music, or art history. It is possible to satisfy the college’s general education requirement in a second language, or in the learning objective tagged as “comprehending cross-culturally” with ITAL 301.
Spanish Placement

Spanish Placement

Students wishing to take Spanish to fulfill the College's general education requirement must take the departmental placement examination. Those students who have never taken Spanish should consult with the department chair in order to register for SPAN 103. Students who have taken at least two years of Spanish in high school will be placed no lower than SPAN 113. Students may not enroll at a course level beneath that indicated by the placement examination without the permission of the department chair.
Theme Houses

Theme Houses

The residents of Casa de España y las Américas theme house live in a communal setting overseen by a graduate native speaker. The house sponsors various cultural and social activities. The Paschall House serves as the Casa Italiana, or the Italian House. Its mission is to promote the awareness and education of the Italian language and culture to students.

Language Laboratory

The E.L. Kellerman Language Resource Center provides an opportunity for students in the modern foreign languages to immerse themselves in the sounds and culture of their target language. The facility features a state of the art Sanako Lab 100 system for practice with listening and speaking; a Satellite TV with stations in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish; wireless Apple Macbooks which can be checked out; a Sympodium for multimedia displays; and a cozy reading and viewing lounge with a library of foreign language books, magazines, and videos. Students can also access subscriptions to web-based language learning programs for reinforcing what is being taught in class as well as for learning languages not currently taught at the University. There is also Rosetta Stone software for Arabic, French, German, Hebrew, Hindi, Irish, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Thai, and Turkish. Faculty and students alike take advantage of the language center’s audio- and video-editing equipment and analog-to-digital-conversion facilities in preparing engaging presentations for class. The Language Resource Center is open Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., Fridays 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sundays 4 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Professors: Raulston (Chair), Sanchez-Imizcoz

Associate Professors: Chinchilla, Sandlin

Assistant Professors: Burner, Colbert-Goicoa, Garcia-Santana, Marquez-Gomez, Mylonas-Leegstra

Instructors: Jordan, Martini

In all classes, students will hone skills in reading, writing, and speaking Spanish, engage with the culture of the Spanish-speaking world, and practice critical thinking.

Requirements for the Major in Spanish

The major requires successful completion of the following:

Course Requirements 1,2
SPAN 301Cultural Survey of Spain I 34
SPAN 302Cultural Survey of Spain II 34
SPAN 303Cultural Survey of Latin America I 34
SPAN 304Cultural Survey of Latin America II 34
SPAN 495Senior Seminar 44
Select four additional courses in Spanish (SPAN) 516
Select one additional course in Spanish (SPAN) numbered 400 or above 54
Total Semester Hours40
Additional Requirements
A comprehensive examination 4
Study abroad 6

Honors

Toward the end of the penultimate semester of study, Spanish majors with a minimum of 3.50 in Spanish courses may apply for permission to present themselves for departmental honors Students who demonstrate excellence in their honors paper, in the written comprehensive examination, and in the oral presentation of their work, upon the approval of the department, earn departmental honors.

Minors

The Department of Spanish offers two study abroad programs. These include Summer in Spain, in which students hike the Camino de Santiago pilgrimage route across the north of the country, and Semester in Spain, which focuses on Spain and the European Union with travel to Latin America and, in recent years, Cuba and Brazil.

Sewanee Semester in Spain

The Sewanee Semester in Spain Program focuses on contemporary Spain and its relationship to and membership in the European Union. It is interdisciplinary in nature, with each course looking at a variety of issues from multiple perspectives. Classes meet in Madrid with professors and tutors from Madrid’s Complutense University. Three trips form part of the program: a weekend-long trip to Santiago de Compostela, a five-day trip to Morocco, and a week-long visit to the European Union headquarters. The program consists of the following:

Course Requirements
ARTH 497Europe: A Community in the Arts4
INGS 306Spain in the European Union4
SPAN 321Advanced Spanish Language4
SPAN 323Contemporary Spanish Culture and Civilization4
Total Semester Hours16

Sewanee Summer in Spain

The Sewanee Summer in Spain program is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of medieval Spain and the pilgrimage route to Santiago de Compostela. Classes meet in Sewanee, in Madrid, and on the pilgrimage road in northern Spain. The program consists of the following:

Course Requirements
ARTH 495Spanish Art, Western Art, and the Road to Santiago4
PHED 214Pilgrimage to Santiago0
SPAN 322Introduction to Medieval Spain and the Road to Santiago4
Total Semester Hours8

Spanish Courses

SPAN 103     Elementary Spanish I  (4)

Part I of a year-long intensive, introductory course with emphasis on the fundamentals of grammar (both written and spoken) and extensive practice in listening comprehension and reading. Four class hours per week. Prerequisite: Placement.

SPAN 104     Elementary Spanish II  (4)

Part II of a year-long intensive, introductory course with emphasis on the fundamentals of grammar (both written and spoken) and extensive practice in listening comprehension and reading. Four class hours per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 103.

SPAN 113     Elementary Spanish: Accelerated Review Course  (4)

An accelerated Spanish review course for those students with at least two years of high school Spanish. The course emphasizes the fundamentals of grammar (written and spoken) and practice in listening comprehension and reading. Four class hours per week. This course is not open for credit to students who have received credit for SPAN 104. Prerequisite: Placement.

SPAN 203     Intermediate Spanish  (4)

An intensive grammar review. Emphasis is on correct expression, vocabulary acquisition, and reading facility. Four class hours per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 104 or SPAN 113 or placement.

SPAN 290     Cults of Personality: Individuals who Shape the Cultural Identity of Latin America  (4)

This course, which is taught in English, examines the cultural impact that certain personalities have had on notions of Latin American identity through literature, film, and music. The course considers the evolution of an icon and how life and possibly death affect the way in which the world sees them. Possible personalities to be considered include Cesar Chavez, Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, Jose Marti, Simon Bolivar, Pablo Escobar, Diego Maradona, Victor Jara, and Che Guevera. Taught in English.

SPAN 291     Spanish Culture and Civilization through the Visual Arts  (4)

A survey of Spanish civilization from pre-history to the present day, with an emphasis on the visual arts as cultural expression. Taught in English.

SPAN 292     Hispanic Communities in the United States  (4)

A broad survey of the experience of Hispanic communities in the United States, both past and present. Topics may include migration, bilingualism, multiculturalism, identity politics, and nativism, among others. Prerequisite: SPAN 203.

SPAN 300     Introduction to Hispanic Literature  (4)

Readings from a number of authors and periods introduce the student to the variety of genres, themes, and styles that predominate in the Hispanic literatures. Prerequisite: SPAN 203 or placement.

SPAN 301     Cultural Survey of Spain I  (4)

A cultural survey of Spain emphasizing literature, history, and the arts from the Middle Ages to 1700. This course, along with SPAN 302, SPAN 303, and SPAN 304, constitutes the core of the major in Spanish. Students are strongly encouraged to take all four of these courses before undertaking more advanced study. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Spanish or placement.

SPAN 302     Cultural Survey of Spain II  (4)

A cultural survey of Spain emphasizing literature, history, and the arts from 1700 to the present. This course, along with SPAN 301, SPAN 303, and SPAN 304, constitutes the core of the major in Spanish. Students are strongly encouraged to take all four of these courses before undertaking more advanced study. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Spanish or placement.

SPAN 303     Cultural Survey of Latin America I  (4)

A cultural survey of Latin America emphasizing literature, history, and the arts from Pre-Colombian cultures to the nineteenth-century wars of independence. This course, along with SPAN 301, SPAN 302, and SPAN 304, constitutes the core of the major in Spanish. Students are strongly encouraged to take all four of these courses before undertaking more advanced study. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Spanish or placement.

SPAN 304     Cultural Survey of Latin America II  (4)

A cultural survey of Latin America emphasizing literature, history, and the arts from the independence period to the present. This course, along with SPAN 301, SPAN 302, and SPAN 303, constitutes the core of the major in Spanish. Students are strongly encouraged to take all four of these courses before undertaking more advanced study. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Spanish or placement.

SPAN 311     Spanish Phonetics  (4)

A comparative study of the sound systems of Spanish and English. The course includes instruction in the use of the International Phonetic alphabet, as well as in phonetic and linguistic terminology, with considerable emphasis placed on pronunciation and laboratory practice. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 312     Advanced Grammar and Composition  (4)

An intensive and detailed review of Spanish grammar with a focus on literary and practical stylistics. Analysis of literary texts and stress on improvement in writing. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 321     Advanced Spanish Language  (4)

Grammar review and drill on colloquial speech and idioms. Expository writing will be emphasized. Tutorial visits to cultural sites form part of the work of this class, as does the language component of film study. This course is part of the Sewanee Semester in Spain.

SPAN 322     Introduction to Medieval Spain and the Road to Santiago  (4)

An introduction to the history, literature, and culture of medieval Spain. Selected texts from the Spanish medieval canon, monastic culture, and the complex relationships among Christians, Muslims, and Jews. Emphasis on the phenomenon of the pilgrimage road that crosses northern Spain. This course is part of the Sewanee Summer in Spain program. Prerequisite: Only open to students who have completed one course in Spanish numbered 203 or higher or placement and been admitted to the Sewanee Summer in Spain program.

SPAN 323     Contemporary Spanish Culture and Civilization  (4)

An in-depth study of contemporary Spain using the city of Madrid as laboratory and extended field trip. Topics include cinema, art, family structure, education, current politics, religion, daily social patterns, unique urban structures, etc. This course is part of the Sewanee Semester in Spain.

SPAN 324     In the “Other’s” House: A Study-Trip to Cuba  (2)

An intensive, two-week course on contemporary Cuba with pre-trip meetings and a post-trip final paper. Emphasis given to the Revolution, including its achievements and consequences. Special attention to the global impact of Cuban culture. Topics include history, economics, public policy, US-Cuban relations, Afro-Cuban identity, and fine arts. Visits on-site in Cuba to museums, cultural institutions, and historic places, including interviews with key cultural and public figures. Readings and writing in Spanish expected for Spanish majors and minors, but course is also open to others.

SPAN 325     Cultural Development in the Gaucho Heartland  (4)

Intensive study of Argentinian and Uruguayan history with special attention to the questions of cultural development and the evolution of the figure and national icon of the gaucho. Classwork and travel in Argentina and Uruguay. Attention to the divergent development of the two countries. Topics include basic geography of the region, history, politics, literature, film, music, and art.

SPAN 326     Spanish Conversation and Cultural Immersion  (4)

Focusing on building students’ ability to engage in everyday interactions with native speakers in different sociocultural contexts, this course’s work includes conversation emphasizing pronunciation, fluency, and vocabulary. Students improve their listening and speaking skills and develop conversational strategies in Spanish while visiting the city of Cartagena, Colombia as an extension of the classroom. Students will take guided visits to appropriate places of interest (theaters, neighborhoods, markets, churches, etc.) where they will practice the language with the city's residents and become immersed in the culture. Prerequisite: Only open to students who have completed SPAN 300 or higher and been admitted to the Sewanee Summer in Colombia program.

SPAN 330     Middle Ages in Spanish Culture and Literature  (4)

A consideration of different aspects of music, art and literature from the fall of the Roman Empire to the government of the Catholic Monarchs. Special attention is given to compositions and oral presentations. Prerequisite: One 300 level course in Spanish or placement.

SPAN 331     Spanish Prose Fiction I  (4)

A study of the evolution of prose fiction from medieval times through the seventeenth century through the reading of unabridged texts. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 333     Spanish Poetry and Drama I  (4)

An integrated study of these two genres read in unabridged texts from the Renaissance and Golden Age. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 334     The Culture of Chivalry  (4)

An exploration of various issues surrounding the figure of the mounted warrior in history and literature in the Spanish Middle Ages. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 361     Modern Spanish Literature II  (4)

An advanced survey of the twentieth century to the present. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 362     Spanish Prose Fiction II  (4)

A study of the evolution of prose fiction from the eighteenth century to the present through the reading of unabridged texts. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 363     Spanish Poetry and Drama II  (4)

An integrated study of these two genres read in unabridged texts. First semester: Medieval, Renaissance, and Golden Age; second semester: 1700 to present. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 364     Spanish Women Writers  (4)

Selected readings from Spanish women authors who represent various genres and time periods. In relation to each period, the course examines how selected writers portray gender, sexuality, social class, and other issues in their work. The course uses primary and secondary texts related to the authors and/or the period under consideration. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 365     Modern Spanish Drama  (4)

A study of the evolution of Spanish Drama during the twentieth century. Special attention is given to the influence of historical events and literary movements that affected the development of drama. All plays are read in full unabridged texts. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 366     On the Margins of Spain  (4)

This course exposes students to the often-overlooked reality of Spain as a pluricultural, plurilingual nation and to the complex interactions between the political-cultural center and its peripheral "historical nationalities": the Basque Country, Catalonia, and Galicia. Students examine what is different about literature written in minority languages and the relationship between literature and the construction or expression of identity. The course is taught in Spanish, using translations of texts and other cultural products written in Spain's minority languages, focusing especially on the contemporary period. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 367     Spain through its Film  (4)

This course introduces students to Spanish cinema, from Luis Buñuel’s first films of the 1920s and 30s to the present. Studying both masterpieces and lesser-known works, the course focuses on the representation of national, ethnic, gender, and class identities. It provides students an overview of Peninsular cinema and the critical tools to analyze filmic language. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 380     20th- and 21st-Century Latin American Poetry  (4)

A study of the major figures and movements beginning with Ruben Dario and modernismo. Special emphasis on the poetry of Huidobro, Neruda, Vallejo, Borges, Mistral, Paz, and Alegria. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 381     History of Latin American Cinema  (4)

This course examines the development of Latin American cinema within a chronological framework. Students become familiar with major cinematic themes, movements, and works from Latin America. The course fosters an analysis of cinema through film language and theory, and in conjunction with Latin America's cultural and historical context. Taught in English.

SPAN 382     Post-Revolutionary Mexican Literature  (4)

This course examines the literature and culture that shaped Mexico's history after the Revolution of 1910. The historical frame takes into account the period of institutionalization (1920-1940), the birth of popular and civil organization (1950-1970), and the establishment of Neoliberalism (1928-2000). Among the genres and cultural trends to be studied: historical novel, urban chronicle, testimonial narrative, detective fiction, muralismo, and contemporary Mexican film. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 383     Spanish-American Novel  (4)

A general survey with focus on the contemporary period and the evolution of narrative form. Included are discussions of the indigenous forms and colonial prose forerunners of romantic and realistic novels. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 384     Contemporary Hispanic Caribbean Literature and Culture  (4)

This course focuses on the cultural production of Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic. After establishing the social and historical context of the region, the course centers around the literature and film from the Cuban Revolution to today. The experience of Caribbean immigrants to the U.S. is also considered. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 385     Spanish-American Short Fiction and Film  (4)

A study of the development of short fiction from Echeverria's "El Matadero" to contemporary works by Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortazar, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Senel Paz, etc. The course examines several films and gives special attention to their relationship to literary works. This course occasionally has a second section in English. Students may not use the English language section for the major or minor in Spanish. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 386     Contemporary Central American Literature and Film  (4)

This course examines political, social and cultural processes in contemporary Central America through the lens of literature and films from or about the region. Topics include Central American revolutionary movements (1960-1996), state violence, indigenous rights, migration and Diaspora, urban marginality, gangs, the drug-trade, and U.S. involvement in the region. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 387     Latin American Women Authors  (4)

Readings from Latin American women authors who represent various regions, genres, and time periods. Examines the portrayal of gender, sexuality, race/ethnicity, social class, and other issues in their work. Readings in literary theory and criticism help with the interpretations of the primary texts. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 388     Women Authors of the Hispanic Caribbean and Diaspora  (4)

This course highlights the work of women authors from Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico, on the islands and in the United States. Key issues include gender, sexuality, race/ethnicity, migration, and biculturalism. Includes several literary genres and film with an emphasis on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 389     U.S. Latino and Latina Literature and Culture  (4)

A panoramic survey of the cultural production of Latinos and Latinas, or Hispanics, in the United States. Representative works from various literary genres, films, and the visual arts serve as the basis for the examination of recurring themes, which include: identity and self-definition, biculturalism, exile, migration, social class, political and social engagement, race, gender, and sexuality. Taught in English. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 203 or higher or placement.

SPAN 390     Latin American Literature and the Environment  (4)

A study of diverse ways in which Latin American literature and culture have portrayed the relationship between humans and the natural environment. Students study texts, films, and other materials from selected geographic regions to foster understanding of the cultural, political, and ecological history of environmental issues in Latin America. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 391     Contemporary Spanish and Latin American Cinema  (4)

This course explores and analyzes a selection of contemporary Spanish and Latin American films directed by men and women. The course provides a panoramic view of current trends in cinema along with basic analytical and theoretical tools to better understand the film text. The course is organized thematically around topics of politics of memory, gender and sexuality, and social and global issues. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 392     Audiovisual Cultures in Latin America  (4)

Based on theoretical approaches and following a chronological order, this course examines and analyzes a series of visual and auditive artistic manifestations developed by Latin American cultures. Topics include the painting, sculpture, architecture, and music of the Indian Baroque; the Casta Paintings; Mexican Muralism; the rise of the Bolero; photojournalism; the Third Cinema and the documentary tradition; the dictatorship aesthetic; the identity politics of telenovelas (soap operas); and pop music. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or SPAN 302 or SPAN 303 or SPAN 304 or SPAN 391.

SPAN 393     Spanish and Hispanic American Women Filmmakers  (4)

This course explores and analyzes a selection of films directed by women in the Spanish and Hispanic American context. The course reviews theoretical approaches to cinema and considers the transnational nature of film production. The course is organized chronologically and deals with topics of gender and sexuality, politics of representation and memory, and other social and global issues. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or SPAN 302 or SPAN 303 or SPAN 304.

SPAN 404     Spanish Civil War and its Legacy  (4)

A study of the Republic, the Civil War, the dictatorship of Franco, and the transition to democracy. Students examine texts, films, and other materials from both sides of the conflict and give special attention to issues and controversies in contemporary Spain related to the war. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 407     Writing the Nation: Literature, Nationalism and Search for Identity in Latin America (1810-Present)  (4)

A study of national projects in Latin America from 1810 to the present. Topics include Bolivar, the wars of independence, nineteenth-century visions of progress, Vasconcelos' concept of The Cosmic Race, and contemporary movements for the inclusion of women, blacks, Native Americans, gays, and other marginalized groups in a common Latin American culture. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 409     Marvel and Margin in Latin American Culture  (4)

This course examines the recurrence of marginality and the marvelous as motifs in Latin American culture from the conquest to the present. These motifs are studied in relation to three thematic binaries: Civilization/Barbarism, Beauty/Monstrosity, and Realism/Fantasy. Students engage with relevant texts, films, and art from Latin American while paying close attention to current theoretical perspectives on the region. Prerequisite: SPAN 303 and SPAN 304.

SPAN 413     The Middle Ages after the Middle Ages  (4)

This course explores the reinterpretation and use of medieval works and of the Spanish Middle Ages itself in various post-medieval contexts from the Renaissance to the 21st century. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or SPAN 322 or SPAN 330 or SPAN 334.

SPAN 420     Experiences of Displacement: Migration and Exile in the Hispanic World  (4)

A civic engagement course that examines displacement in the Hispanic world in its theoretical and experiential dimensions. The course analyzes literary and cultural products from the Hispanic world, while participating in community engagement with the Latinx community on the Cumberland Plateau. The aim of the course is to develop an understanding of the individual and collective aspects of migration and exile beyond the text; to reflect on the ethnic and sociocultural diversity of the area, and to develop civic awareness. Prerequisite: One course in Spanish numbered 300 or higher.

SPAN 440     Directed Readings  (2 or 4)

Announced topics for selected students. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic differs. Prerequisite: Instructor prerequisite override required.

SPAN 444     Independent Study  (2 or 4)

For selected students. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic differs. Prerequisite: Instructor prerequisite override required.

SPAN 450     Special Topics  (4)

Study of a variable topic of special interest bearing on either Spanish or Latin American Literature. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic differs. Prerequisite: one course in Spanish numbered 301 or higher.

SPAN 495     Senior Seminar  (4)

Shared readings on key topics and concepts related to the Hispanic world. Each student also engages in research on a topic of interest, culminating in a critical research paper and an oral presentation. This seminar serves to fulfill the writing-intensive requirement within the major. Open only to seniors pursuing majors in Spanish.

Italian Courses

ITAL 103     Elementary Italian I  (4)

An intensive, introductory course with emphasis on the fundamentals of grammar (both written and spoken) and extensive practice in listening comprehension and reading. Four class hours per week.

ITAL 104     Elementary Italian II  (4)

An intensive, introductory course with emphasis on the fundamentals of grammar (both written and spoken) and extensive practice in listening comprehension and reading. Four class hours per week. Prerequisite: ITAL 103 or placement.

ITAL 203     Intermediate Italian  (4)

An intensive grammar review. Emphasis is on correct expression, vocabulary, and reading facility. Students completing this class may register for ITAL 301. Prerequisite: ITAL 104 or placement.

ITAL 301     Introduction to Italian Literature  (4)

This course serves as a bridge from language and culture courses to literary studies. Students read Italian poetry from the thirteenth century to the present, with discussions focusing on the comprehension of complex grammatical structures, tools for literary analysis, and historical-cultural analysis of Italian poetic works. Taught in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL 203 or placement.

ITAL 302     Introduction to Drama  (4)

This course serves as a bridge from language and culture courses to literary studies. Students read Italian plays from the sixteenth century to the present, with discussions focusing on the comprehension of complex grammatical structures, tools for literary analysis, and historical-cultural analysis of Italian poetic works. Taught in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL 203 or placement.

ITAL 303     Introduction to Prose  (4)

This course serves as a bridge from language and culture courses to literary studies. Students read texts in a variety of major genres (letters, short stories, travelogues, treatises, novels) from the fourteenth century to the present. Students also continue to develop language skills by observing complex grammatical structures while acquiring the tools needed to conduct literary analysis and criticism. Taught in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL 203 or placement.

ITAL 304     Petrarch's Many Tongues  (4)

Petrarch has many claims to fame: master of the love sonnet, obsessive curator of the lyric self, father of humanism, stylistic exemplar to the Renaissance. Students will delve deeply into Petrarch's Canzoniere -- his major collection of poetry -- and his pithy works in prose, gaining a nuanced understanding of the 14th-century Italian author's contribution to the Western literary canon. All texts will be read and discussed in English; students with knowledge of Italian or Latin are encouraged to read in the original language.

ITAL 309     Italian Americans in Cinema and Literature  (4)

This course analyzes the experience of migration and assimilation of Italian Americans in films and novels. Coursework explores the representation of Italian American identities with regards to race and ethnicity, family and gender roles, labor and political activism, and the glamorization of crime. This course is taught in English.

ITAL 310     Being Good in Medieval and Renaissance Italy  (4)

This course involves the examination of medieval and Early Modern Italian texts that aim to define morals, ethics, or manners. What does it mean to be a good person? What makes for a good community? How should one order one's responsibilities to the self, community, and God? What is justice, and where might it be found? If people desire good things, why do they often find vice more interesting than virtue? Such questions are addressed through analysis of selected writings by Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Machiavelli, Baldassare Castiglione, and Giovanni Della Casa. Taught in English, but students with the equivalent of four semesters of Italian language may elect to do some reading or other coursework in Italian.

ITAL 325     Women Writers in Early Modern Italy  (4)

A study of poetry, plays, letters, treatises, and prose written by Italian women in the fifteenth-seventeenth centuries. Students examine the varied ways in which women in early modern Italy engaged questions of gender, aesthetics, ethics, and philosophy in their writings, encountered here in translation.

ITAL 350     Special Topics  (4)

Study of a variable topic of special interest pertaining to Italian literature, culture, or cinema. Taught in English. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic differs.

ITAL 355     Special Topics  (4)

An introduction to a literary genre or other special topic of interest in Italian literary or cultural studies. Taught in Italian. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic differs. Prerequisite: ITAL 203.

ITAL 440     Directed Reading  (4)

A study of Italian literature from the twelfth century to the present. Texts selected will vary each spring. Taught in Italian. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic differs. Prerequisite: Instructor prerequisite override required.