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Daniel Anderson (2014)
B.A., University of Cincinnati; M.A., Johns Hopkins University
Teaching Professor

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Christopher H. Bachelder (2015)
B.A., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; M.A., Auburn University; M.F.A., University of Florida
Teaching Professor

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John Miller Grammer (1992)
B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.A., University of Virginia; Ph.D., University of Virginia
Professor of English and Director, School of Letters

Michael A. Griffith (2015)
B.A., Princeton University; M.F.A., Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College
Teaching Professor

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Adrianne Marie Harun (2014)
M.F.A., Warren Wilson College
Teaching Professor

David R. Huddle (2014)
M.F.A., Columbia University in the City of New York
Teaching Professor

Andrew L. Hudgins, Jr. (2014)
M.F.A., The University of Alabama
Teaching Professor

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Holly Goddard Jones (2015)
B.A., University of Kentucky; M.F.A., The Ohio State University
Teaching Professor

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Jennifer B. Lewin (2012)
B.A., Brandeis University; M.A., Yale University; M.Phil., Yale University; Ph.D., Yale University
Teaching Professor

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Pamela Royston Macfie (1984)
B.A., Goucher College; M.A., Duke University; Ph.D., Duke University
Professor of English

Charles F. Martin (2014)
B.A., Fordham University; Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo
Teaching Professor

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Allen Hilliard Reddick (2015)
M.A., University of Cambridge; M.Phil., Columbia University in the City of New York; Ph.D., Columbia University in the City of New York
Teaching Professor

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Neil Edward Shea (2014)
M.A., Boston University
Teaching Professor

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Diane M. Thiel (2011)
B.A., Brown University; M.F.A., Brown University
Teaching Professor

Virginia Lauryl Hicks Tucker (2009)
B.A., The University of the South; M.A., University of Virginia; Ph.D., University of Virginia
Associate Professor of English

Freshman Year
EasterSemester Hours
AMST 310 Exploring Southern Identities: From the Rebel Yell to "We Shall Overcome" 4
AMST 333 Junior Seminar 4
 Semester Hours8
Advent
AMST 150 4
AMST 251 Black Masculinity in the United States 4
AMST 255 Imagining Africa 4
 Semester Hours12
 Total Semester Hours20

HIST 111

Test to public

Course List

ANGL 337C.S. Lewis: Author, Apologist, and Anglican3
ANGL 537C.S. Lewis: Author, Apologist, and Anglican3
ANGL 538Anglicanism: Traditions, Identities, and Conflicts3
ANGL 540The Shape of the Communion3
ANGL 541Healing and Wholeness in Africa (Commenting on this course)3
ANGL 544Anglican Conciliarity3
Comment Entry Test
Total Semester Hours18

Plan of Study

Freshman Year
AdventSemester Hours
CEMT 361 Climate Ethics 3
CEMT 362 God and Nature 3
CEMT 363 Sustainability as an Ethical Problem 3
CEMT 500 Creation, Ecology, and Economy 3
 Semester Hours12
Easter
CEMT 511 Introduction to Moral Theology (Testing) 3
CEMT 522 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
CEMT 553 Many Sides of Sustainability 3
CEMT 556 Building the Beloved Community 3
 Semester Hours12
Summer
CEMT 557 Marriage, Family, and Sexuality 3
CEMT 558 The Theological Ethics of Stanley Hauerwas 3
CEMT 560 Environmental Ethics 3
CEMT 561 Climate Ethics 3
 Semester Hours12
Sophomore Year
Advent
CEMT 600 Creation, Ecology, and Economy 3
CEMT 660 Environmental Ethics 3
 Semester Hours6
Easter
CEMT 594 Directed Readings 1-4
 Semester Hours1-4
Summer
CEMT 563 Sustainability as an Ethical Problem 3
 Semester Hours3
Junior Year
Advent
CEMT 562 Christian Social Ethics 3
 Semester Hours3
Easter
Testing comment  
 Semester Hours0
 Total Semester Hours49-52

Course Blocks

AMST 251     Black Masculinity in the United States  (4)

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of constructions of Black masculinity in the United States from the twentieth century through the present. Autobiographical accounts are used to examine historical and current definitions of Black manhood that challenge and reinforce understandings of what it means to be both Black and male.

AMST 444     Independent Study  (2 or 4)

Open only to students pursuing majors in American studies. Prerequisite: Professor consent and prerequisite override required.

AMST 255     Imagining Africa  (4)

This course examines popular notions of Africa and its relationship to a global African diaspora. Literature is used to question how Africa has served historically as a metaphor for exoticism, sexuality, and savagery in western discourse and, in the contemporary world, as an imagined site of seemingly insoluble problems such as genocide, famine, and the collapse of the state.

AMST 310     Exploring Southern Identities: From the Rebel Yell to "We Shall Overcome"  (4)

This interdisciplinary course focuses on cultural and community formation in the Deep South. Faculty from related disciplines address the organic connection between location and culture, with emphasis on the region's music, architecture, foodways, and politics; the formation of communities and institutions is emphasized in considering larger events like the Civil Rights Movement. Prerequisite: HIST 100 or (HUMN 101 and HUMN 102).

Inline Course

This is a test of Inline Courses, as an example I am using HOML 535.

Pre-Defined Table

A+ 4.0
A 3.8
A- 3.5
B+ 3.8
B 3.5
Etc. And So On

Footnotes

Internal and External URLs:

Internal - Tuition Fees

External - Leepfrog

BUSI 215     Fundamentals of Financial Accounting  (4)

The instructional objective is to provide students with an understanding of the concepts that are fundamental to the use of accounting. A decision-making approach is employed which involves critical evaluation and analysis of information presented. Important analytical tools are integrated throughout the course.

BUSI 216     Fundamentals of Managerial Accounting  (4)

The course focuses on the internal use of accounting information in the formulation of management decisions. Students learn how financial systems can add value to a company. Different costing systems, budgetary planning, and incremental analysis are among the course contents. A field trip is included. Prerequisite: ACCT 215 or BUSI 215.

BUSI 217     Marketing Strategy  (4)

This course introduces students to concepts, analyses, and activities that comprise marketing. Topics include product positioning, market segmentation, and various aspects of the "marketing mix" such as advertising, distribution, and pricing. Emphasis is on the development and use of analytical skills to solve marketing problems. Significant attention is also devoted to cross-cultural issues, the relation of marketing to underlying social science disciplines (including economics, psychology, sociology, and anthropology), and the ethics of marketing decisions. Prerequisite: BUSI 215 or ECON 360. Prerequisite or Corequisite: PSYC 100 or PSYC 101 or ANTH 104.

BUSI 352     Proseminar I  (4)

Designed to complement the student's internship experience, this seminar features a selected topic involving the study of business and markets such as business history or philosophical perspectives on capitalism. The seminar includes instruction designed to help students develop practical business skills. Open only to Carey Fellows. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

BUSI 353     Proseminar II  (4)

A continuation of proseminar I. Open only to Carey Fellows. Prerequisite: ECON 101 and BUSI 352.

BUSI 385     Special Topics  (2 or 4)

A selection of topics are explored depending on interest. May be repeated when topic differs.

ARTH 103     Survey of Western Art I  (4)

A survey of the architecture, sculpture, painting, and decorative arts of the West from prehistory to the end of the Middle Ages.

ARTH 104     Survey of Western Art II  (4)

A continuation of ARTH 103, beginning with the art of the Italian Renaissance and concluding with the major artistic developments of the 20th century.

ARTH 107     The Films of Alfred Hitchcock  (4)

Rear Window will serve as a model for Hitchcock's persistent interest in climactic chases, claustrophobic locations, sexual voyeurism, ironic humor, and a sense of the inevitability of fate. Analysis of other Hitchcock films from the late twenties to the mid sixties will emphasize the director's treatment of editing, framing, sound, and mis en scene. Students will become familiar with a variety of critical approaches and with cultural and historical influences on Hitchcock's work.

ARTH 202     History of Photography  (4)

This course introduces students to the history of photography, from the invention of the medium in the 1830s to recent practices of photographers and artists working with a wide variety of photographic technologies. Emphasis is given to key artist, artistic movements, and theories of photography, as well as to visual literacy and familiarity with the multiple genres and social functions of photographic image production.

ARTH 206     History of Architecture  (4)

A critical and historical survey of architecture from antiquity to the present day. This course focuses on major developments in the West, with consideration of Islamic influences. Representative monuments are used to introduce the student to construction techniques, architectural theory, and interpretation of the built environment. Prerequisite: ARTH 103.

ARTH 207     The Arts of Asia  (4)

A survey of the visual arts of India, China, Japan, and neighboring countries from prehistory to the present. The major monuments consisting of architecture, sculpture, and painting are discussed. Both indigenous and cross-cultural aspects of each art work are examined in the light of style, iconography, and historical context.

ARTH 210     Islamic Art and Architecture  (4)

A survey of the origins, characteristics, and development of Islamic art, approached by considering productions ranging from architecture to sumptuary arts. This course covers the early formation and definition of Islamic art during the Ummayad and Abbasid periods and later phases of splendor in late Medieval and Modern eras. It includes the art and architecture of Fatimids, Mamluks, Saljuks, Ottomans, Ilkhanids, Timurids, and Safavids, in areas stretching from the Iberian Peninsula and northern Africa to India.

ARTH 212     American Animation, 1910-1960  (4)

A chronological examination of the most significant and influential short and full-length animated features made in the United States between 1910 and 1960. This course begins with the experiments of Winsor McCay ("Little Nemo," 1911) and ends with the rise of made-for-television cartoon in early 1960s. Emphasis is placed both on major studios in New York, Kansas City, and Los Angeles and on pioneering directors and animators working in those studios. The course also situates the work of those studios, directors, and animators within the larger contexts of twentieth century American history and popular culture.

ARTH 307     Japanese Art  (4)

A survey of the visual arts of Japan from prehistory to the present, including a discussion of the stylistic, historical and social significance of major art works in a variety of media including architecture, sculpture, painting, prints, ceramics, and gardens. Japanese ways of thinking, as well as the cross-cultural issues reflected in each art work, will also be discussed.

ARTH 308     Gender in Japanese Art  (4)

Using gender as a lens for examining works of art in the Japanese tradition from the thirteenth through twentieth centuries, this course examines a wide variety of formats and mediums, including corpse paintings, cross-dressing performers, and prints of the modern girl. Participants will identify and analyze varying interpretations of gender through time and across culture and address issues associated with applying contemporary gender theory to pre-modern works. Topics to be covered include: Buddhist ideas of the feminine, voyeurism in early modern woodblock prints, and the role of gender in contemporary art.

ARTH 309     Sacred Arts of China  (4)

Following a chronological sequence, this course introduces religious artworks of China from the prehistoric period to the present day and examines artwork from Buddhist and Taoist religions. It investigates two-dimensional works, sculpture, and architecture and explores such topics as the relationship between ritual practice and the visual arts, images of the natural landscape, pilgrimage, cave temples, religion and political rule, and the interactions of major religious and philosophical beliefs.

ARTH 310     Far East in American Visual Culture  (4)

An examination of the American fascination with and assimilation of art and culture of the "Far East" as demonstrated by japonisme in Victorian America, Zen in contemporary art, as well as Orientalism in popular culture. While emphasis is on painting, a variety of media (including architecture, sculpture, decorative arts, prints, photography, and film) are discussed. The ideological, religious, and social issues are addressed along with the stylistic and aesthetic ones. Prerequisite: One course in art history, Asian studies or American studies.

ARTH 312     Greek and Roman Art and Architecture  (4)

A chronological survey of the painting, sculpture, and architecture of the Greek, and Hellenistic worlds and Roman Empire from the eighth century B.C.E. to the fourth century C.E. While emphasizing stylistic developments, political and cultural contexts will also be examined. Prerequisite: ARTH 103 or HUMN 101 or HUMN 102 or HUMN 103.

ARTH 316     Introduction to Museum Studies  (4)

Providing students with a survey of museology and the museum field, this course covers the history of museums, contemporary museum practice, and theories of representation. It explores the role of museums in society through readings, lectures, site visits, and class projects, and introduces the fundamentals of collections, exhibitions, the curatorial process, museum education, and administration.

ARTH 317     Approaches to Art History  (4)

This writing-intensive seminar addresses the history and methods of art history by exploring its philosophical development. The current state of the discipline as it negotiates the theoretical challenges of poststructuralism and postmodernism will also be explored. Written and oral assignments develop the students' research and communication skills. Open only to students pursuing programs in art history. Prerequisite: ARTH 103 and ARTH 104.

ARTH 318     Spanish Medieval Art  (4)

A survey of Spanish art from the Visigothic period through the fifteenth century. Topics to include pre-Romanesque, Romanesque, Gothic, and Mudejar art in the Christian realms as well as the Spanish-Muslim art of Al Andalus. Special attention will be given to medieval Iberia as the crucible of Christian, Muslim, and Jewish cultures.

ARTH 320     Medieval Art and Architecture  (4)

The art and architecture of Western Europe from the late Roman Empire to the dawn of the Renaissance. Emphasis will be placed on the development of monumental architecture and the regional peculiarities of sculpture, painting, and the minor arts over the course of this thousand-year period. Prerequisite: ARTH 103 or HUMN 102.

ARTH 322     Art and Devotion in Late Medieval and Early Modern Northern Europe  (4)

This seminar explores the devotional art, literature, and thought of northern Europe in the late thirteenth, fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth centuries. Manuscript illumination and female piety will be especially emphasized. Prerequisite: ARTH 103 or ARTH 104 or HUMN 102.

ARTH 325     Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture  (4)

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy from the late 13th to the close of the 16th century. While the artists and monuments of Florence, Rome, and Venice will be the principal foci, important developments in other centers will also be considered. Prerequisite: ARTH 103 or ARTH 104 or HUMN 102 or HUMN 104.

ARTH 326     Northern Renaissance Art  (4)

A study of northern European art from the early 14th to the late 16th centuries. While the course will concentrate on Flemish and German panel painting, attention will also be paid to French and Flemish manuscript illumination as well as to Netherlandish sculpture. Prerequisite: ARTH 103 or ARTH 104 or HUMN 102.

ARTH 332     Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Art  (4)

This course will address painting, sculpture, and architecture of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe within a variety of social, historical, stylistic, and theoretical contexts in order better to understand the role and meaning of the visual arts in this period. Prerequisite: ARTH 104 or HUMN 202.

ARTH 333     French Art  (4)

A survey of French painting, sculpture, and architecture from the early seventeenth century to the end of the eighteenth century. Emphasis is placed on the founding of the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture, the artistic program of Louis XIV, the development of the rococo style, and the emergence of sensibilité and a new moralizing art in the years leading to the French Revolution. Prerequisite: ARTH 104 or HUMN 104 or HUMN 201.

ARTH 335     Nineteenth-Century Art  (4)

A survey of European painting and sculpture from the 1780s to 1900, with an emphasis on the social and political contexts in which the works were created. While the focus is on the art of France, that of Germany, Spain, and England is also discussed. Prerequisite: ARTH 104 or HUMN 202.

ARTH 338     British Art  (4)

A survey of British art from the late 17th to the close of the 19th century. Emphasis will be on painting; sculpture, architecture, and landscape design will be considered as well. Prerequisite: ARTH 104.

ARTH 340     American Art  (4)

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture in the United States from the Colonial period to 1913, with an emphasis on the relationship between American and European art and artists. Other topics considered include the development of art institutions in this country, in particular art museums and academies. Prerequisite: ARTH 104 or HUMN 202.

ARTH 345     Modern Art  (4)

This course examines various trends in Western art from the 1860s through the 1950s. The role of the visual arts and the means of their production and reception underwent tremendous change during this period. Critics and historians have long referred to this century as the era of modernism. Understood variously as a stylistic, philosophic, social, political, or economic category, the notion of modernism and the significance of this concept for the visual arts provides a guiding theme for lectures and in-class discussions.

ARTH 346     Contemporary Art  (4)

An examination of the critical and thematic issues raised by visual artists working during the second half of the twentieth century. The changing definition of modernism and its relationship to contemporary artistic practice will be analyzed. Toward this end, the class will seek to define modernism and postmodernism as well as some of the myriad other isms that have emerged in art and critical theory over the past fifty years.

ARTH 348     Reframing Architecture and the Decorative Arts: Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau, and Art Deco  (4)

A survey of three major modern art movements in Europe and the United States, in which architecture and the decorative arts became inseparable: Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau, and Art Deco. This course explores the concept of decoration through stylistic, aesthetic, technological, and sociocultural readings of the works associated with those movements. Related art and architectural movements such as Victorian Gothic, American Renaissance, Aestheticism, De Stijl, Purism, and Bauhaus are discussed for contextualization of art works in question. Prerequisite: ARTH 104 or HUMN 202.

ARTH 350     Spanish Painting  (4)

A critical and historical survey of Spanish painting from the sixteenth through twentieth century, this course focuses on major artists against the backdrop of Spain's unique cultural traditions.

ARTH 351     Conceptual Art  (4)

A critical and historical approach to Conceptual art from its origins in the mid-1960s to the present. Lectures and discussions explore aesthetic, social, and political issues raised by Conceptualism as well as strategies these artists have in common including the use of readymade imagery, documentary photography, language, and performance. Artist writings and critical reception to the works of art are emphasized. Prerequisite: ARTH 104 or HUMN 202.

ARTH 360     Pop Art  (4)

This seminar charts the development of Pop Art in North America and Europe between 1960 and 1973, investigating why art made by a diverse group of artists, using a variety of aesthetic techniques, is labeled "pop." Lectures and discussions explore stylistic, social, and political issues raised by Pop as well as features that diverse Pop practices show in common—including the use of readymade imagery, photography, text, and performance. The seminar concludes by tracing Pop art's influence on work from the late 1970s to the present. Prerequisite: ARTH 104 or HUMN 202.

ARTH 365     Modern and Postmodern Architecture  (4)

This survey of architecture and urban planning begins with the revivalist architecture of the nineteenth century and concludes with global contemporary practice, exploring along the way efforts to formulate a "modern" architecture and subsequent postmodern critiques. Students are introduced to significant figures like Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corbusier, Jane Jacobs, Frank Gehry, Michael Graves, and Zaha Hadid, and to significant themes in modern and postmodern architectural practice, like the archetype of architect as hero, architecture as social engineering, and architecture as spectacle. Students thus learn of essential reference points for understanding our built environment and its discourse.

ARTH 370     Art in Germany: 1919-1933  (4)

This course examines artistic production in Germany within the social and political context of the Weimar Republic between 1919 and 1933. The course investigates Expressionism, the "anti-art" theories espoused by Dada artists, and the formal characteristics of New Objectivity painting under the influence of photography. The art and politics of the Bauhaus are explored in detail, including the practices of painting, architecture, and industrial design. The course concludes with consideration of the rapid change in leadership and direction at the Bauhaus and its closing at the hands of the Nazis.

ARTH 402     Senior Seminar  (4)

A seminar designed to introduce students to the research methods and interpretive approaches of art history. Written as well as oral assignments develop students' research and communication skills. Each year the seminar focuses on a specific historical, cultural, or thematic topic chosen by the instructor. Open only to seniors pursuing majors in art history. Prerequisite: ARTH 103 and ARTH 104.

ARTH 440     Independent Study  (2 or 4)

Permission of the instructor required. Prerequisite: Professor consent and prerequisite override required.

ARTH 490     Artistic Centers of Western Europe: Their Art and Architecture, Museums and Monuments  (4)

The travel-study portion of Track Two of European Studies includes a month-long exploration of the Continent including, in France, Paris, Chartres and Beaune; in Italy, Rome, Siena, Florence, Padua, Venice and Ravenna; in Germany, Nurnberg, Bamberg and Munich; in Belgium, Bruges and Ghent; and concludes with a week in London, including a study visit to the National Gallery. Each student produces a daily academic journal and should acquire the ability to look at a building, a painting, or a sculpture and understand its period, its function, the materials and techniques used in its production, as well as the artist's intentions. This course is only available through the European Studies Program.

ARTH 492     Western Europe: Middle Ages and the Renaissance  (4)

This course provides a broad-based, chronological survey of the art and architecture of Western Europe, from the emergence of Christian art in the early fourth century to the development of Mannerism at the end of the Renaissance. Many of the themes and works of art that are explored further on the Continental tour are introduced. Slide lectures trace the general developments of style throughout the period, set within their historical contexts, and focus on individual buildings, manuscripts, pieces of sculpture, metal work or paintings as case studies of technique or patronage. Visits to the Bodleian Library and Ashmolean Museum in Oxford enable students to view examples of the objects studied in the course. This course is only available through the European Studies Program.

ARTH 494     Greece, the Eastern Aegean, and Italy: the Monuments and Centers of Classical Civilization  (4)

The travel-study portion of Track One of European Studies includes a month-long exploration of the Continent including, in Greece, Athens, Delphi, Olympia and the islands of Crete, Santorini (Thera) and Delos; in Turkey, Istanbul, Troy, Aspendos and Didyma; in Italy, Naples, Rome, the Vatican City; and concludes with a week in London, including a study visit to the British Museum. Each student produces a daily academic journal and should acquire the ability to look at a building or a sculpture and understand its period, its function, the materials and techniques used in its production as well as the artist's intentions. This course is only available through the European Studies Program.

ARTH 495     Spanish Art, Western Art, and the Road to Santiago  (4)

An approach to Western Art, particularly Spanish, in connection with the development of the pilgrimage road to Santiago, starting from its origins in early Christianity, focusing on medieval art, and discussing its persistence in the Modern Era. Special emphasis will be given to the importance of multidisciplinary studies concerning the subject. This course is only available through the Sewanee Summer in Spain program. Prerequisite: Only open to students admitted to the Sewanee Summer in Spain program.

ARTH 496     Islamic Spain and Spanish Art  (4)

A survey of Spanish Muslim art from the Emirate to the Nasrid period (8th to 15th centuries), including extensive discussion of the main monuments such as the mosque at Cordoba and the Alhambra palace of Granada. The course examines the presence and persistence of Islamic influence on Spanish Christian art of the late Middle Ages and the modern era. Special attention is given to Mudejar art.

ARTH 497     Europe: A Community in the Arts  (4)

This art history course emphasizes the relationships and interactions between Spain and the other Western European countries as well as Spain as a cultural and artistic bridge between Europe and North Africa and between Europe and the New World. It includes visits to museums, monuments and cultural institutions in Spain, Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany and Morocco with special attention to art collections, collecting and their origins. Selected moments and artworks connected with the fundamental topics of the course are discussed, including examples from Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque times. This course is only available through the Sewanee Semester in Spain program.

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BIOL 100     Biology and Human Affairs (Lab)  (4)

A general course that studies the biological nature of people and their role in the biosphere. This course has a laboratory component and may count toward fulfilling the college's laboratory science requirement. It cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 105.

BIOL 105     Biology and People  (4)

An exploration of the biological nature of people and their role in the biosphere that includes such topics as anatomy; physiology; and the genetic, nutritional, infectious, and environmental aspects of diseases. This course may count toward fulfilling the college's requirement for a non-laboratory science course. It cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 100.

BIOL 107     People and the Environment  (4)

An exploration of how human activities such as food and energy production, resource extraction and waste disposal affect our natural environment and other organisms living in it. Students learn about earth systems, human activities stressing these systems and strategies for dealing with environmental challenges. Specific topics include biodiversity loss and conservation, agriculture and biotechnology, toxicology and environmental health, air and water pollution, and climate change. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 130. Non-laboratory course.

BIOL 109     Food and Hunger: Contemplation and Action  (4)

A study of food and hunger from a biological perspective. The interactions among scientific, ethical, and cultural aspects of hunger are also examined. The readings, lectures, and discussions in the course are supplemented with work with local aid organizations and exploration of the contemplative practices that motivate and sustain many of those who work with the hungry. This course cannot be used in fulfillment of any general education requirement.

BIOL 113     Great Ideas of Science  (4)

An historical and philosophical approach to selected scientific ideas that have had a profound impact on the development of Western civilization. Emphasis will be on the evidence supporting the ideas and controversies that arose during their introduction into our general store of knowledge. Class discussion will be encouraged. Non-laboratory course.

BIOL 114     Introduction to Botany  (4)

Phylogenetic survey of the plant kingdom and a study of flowering plant structures and functions with emphasis on the role plants play in human life. Non-laboratory course.

BIOL 115     Conservation Biology  (4)

A study of the natural processes that control patterns of biological diversity in evolutionary and ecological time and a comprehensive examination of how human activity has resulted in the loss of biodiversity both regionally and globally. Non-laboratory course.

BIOL 118     Current Issues in Biology  (4)

This course focuses on timely and controversial topics presented in popular media. Topics vary with each offering but range from those having to do with human health and well-being to those having to do with survival and the future. This course cannot be taken for credit by students who have already completed BIOL 100, BIOL 105, or any biology course numbered 130 or higher and cannot be counted in the biology major.

BIOL 119     The Human Mind: Artistic and Scientific Creativity  (4)

The course examines brain anatomy and physiology, investigates the contributions of artificial intelligence and neural networking in understanding brain function, and explores an interdisciplinary approach to understanding human creativity. This course cannot be used in fulfillment of any general education requirement.

BIOL 130     Field Investigations in Biology  (4)

A study of ecology, evolution and biological diversity, with an emphasis on scientific investigations in the natural areas in and around the university. The course, which is scheduled for one afternoon each week, meets the general education requirement for a natural science course but does not fulfill the requirement for a laboratory science course.

BIOL 133     Introductory Molecular Biology and Genetics  (4)

This course is an introductory study of the molecular and cellular basis of life, of the structure and function of cells, and of molecular genetics. BIOL 130 is not a prerequisite. Non-laboratory course. Open only to first-year students and sophomores.

BIOL 144     Directed Research  (2 or 4)

Supervised field or laboratory investigation in biology. This course may be taken more than once for credit and is open only to freshmen and sophomores. It is given only on a pass/fail basis, and, therefore, cannot count in fulfillment of requirements for any major or minor. Open only to first-year students and sophomores. Prerequisite: Professor consent and prerequisite override required.

BIOL 180     Principles of Human Nutrition  (4)

This course provides an introduction to nutrition and focuses on the relationship between diet and health. Topics include physiological requirements and functions of protein, energy, and the major vitamins and minerals that are determinants of health and diseases in human populations. These basic concepts are applied to societal issues, including the role of diet in malnutrition, heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Community engagement.

BIOL 200     Entomology  (4)

A study of insects and related arthropods, with special emphasis on the role of insects in forest and freshwater ecosystems. Lecture topics also include environmental, physiological, medical, veterinary, and agricultural entomology. Life history, ecology, and behavior are studied through field trips. Functional morphology and taxonomy are studied through laboratory exercises. Non-laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 130.

BIOL 201     Ornithology (Lab)  (4)

A comprehensive examination of avian biology. Lectures will include student presentations on readings from the scientific literature. Laboratory will emphasize field methods used to study wild birds. A field research project is required. This course cannot be taken for credit by students who have already completed BIOL 108. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 130.

BIOL 202     Invertebrate Zoology (Lab)  (4)

A survey of the invertebrate phyla with an emphasis on natural history, functional morphology, embryology, ecology, and phylogenetic relationships. This course has a laboratory component, which will require experimental and field observation, a semester project, and a field trip to a marine laboratory. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 130.

BIOL 203     Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (Lab)  (4)

This course is a study of the anatomy of the Craniata, including the Hagfishes, and Vertebrates (jawless and jawed fishes, and the tetrapods). It emphasizes the evolution of homologous structures, and relates structure to function where applicable. This course also relates structures to adaptations for life in aquatic and terrestrial environments, and puts these changes into an evolutionary perspective. Laboratory course; studio laboratory. Prerequisite: One course in biology.

BIOL 206     Plant Ecology (Lab)  (4)

A study of plants and their interaction with the environment, with other plants, and with animals will emphasize how plant populations change in size and spatial distribution, how they respond to herbivores and pollinators, and the ecological and evolutionary consequences of plant traits. Laboratories will focus on methods for analyzing population and community dynamics. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: One course in biology.

BIOL 208     Neurobiology  (4)

A comprehensive study of the vertebrate nervous system covering its overall organization and development, function, control of homeostatic systems, and mechanisms of sensory perception. Non-laboratory course. Prerequisite: One course in biology or one course in psychology.

BIOL 209     Advanced Conservation Biology  (4)

A study of the scientific basis for conservation of biological diversity. A case-study approach will be used to address problems relating to species decline, habitat loss, and ecosystem degradation at local, regional, and global scales. Course will emphasize population modeling and GIS applications. Non-laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 130.

BIOL 210     Ecology (Lab)  (4)

A survey of the principles and applications of ecological science. Lecture will cover the ecology of individuals, populations, communities, and ecosystems. Lab will emphasize field experimentation in the local environment. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 130.

BIOL 211     Biodiversity: Pattern and Process (Lab)  (4)

A study of the diversity of life forms. The course examines major events in the evolution of life, the shape of the evolutionary tree of life, and the processes that underlie the origins of biological diversity. Laboratory, field, and statistical methods of biodiversity analysis are emphasized. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 130 and BIOL 133.

BIOL 212     Entomology (Lab)  (4)

A study of insects and related arthropods, with special emphasis on the role of insects in natural and human-altered systems. Lecture topics also include environmental, physiological, medical, veterinary, and agricultural aspects of entomology. Life history, ecology, and behavior are studied through field trips and student projects. Functional morphology and taxonomy are examined through laboratory exercises and by assembling an insect collection. This course cannot be taken for credit by students who have already completed BIOL 200. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 130.

BIOL 213     Evolutionary Biology  (4)

A study of the evolutionary changes that have taken place in biological populations and the mechanisms that underlie these changes. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of data with evolutionary ideas and theory, and the application of evolutionary thought to other areas of biology. Non-laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 130.

BIOL 215     Fungi  (2)

A survey of the characteristics, classification, economic, and biological importance of these organisms together with lichens and slime molds. This course counts as a non-laboratory half-course, but includes some field and laboratory work. This half course may be used in combination with BIOL 216 to constitute a full course in partial fulfillment of the general education requirement in natural science.

BIOL 216     Algae and Bryophytes  (2)

A survey of these groups of organisms emphasizes their distinguishing features, evolutionary trends, and economic and biological importance. This course counts as a non-laboratory half-course, but includes some field and laboratory work. This half course may be used in combination with BIOL 215 to constitute a full course in partial fulfillment of the general education requirement in natural science.

BIOL 218     Principles of Animal Nutrition and Metabolism  (4)

Emphasizing the connection between diet and health across the animal kingdom, this course focuses on the application of biochemical principles and concepts to nutrition. Topics include physiological requirements; functions of macronutrients, vitamins, and minerals; and the relationship between those nutrients and disease. Prerequisite: BIOL 133.

BIOL 220     Reading the Landscape (Lab)  (4)

A study of how patterns in the current biological and physical landscape of the Cumberland Plateau can be explained by historical human land use and natural disturbances. Landscape change is examined through field investigation of specific places on the Domain conducted in combination with the analysis of aerial imagery and other geospatial data resources. The course also addresses how disturbance history can influence one's aesthetic valuation of the landscape and guide landscape-level conservation efforts. Prerequisite: BIOL 130.

BIOL 221     Environmental Physiology of Plants (Lab)  (4)

A study of plant physiological processes and how adaptations shared by plant functional groups are shaped by environment. The course covers energy and carbon balance, water and nutrient relations, and interactions with other organisms and physiological responses to environmental stress. Labs focus on instrumentation and field methods used to test ecophysiological hypotheses. Prerequisite: BIOL 130.

BIOL 222     Advanced Conservation Biology (Lab)  (4)

An examination of the negative impact of human activity on biological diversity and an exploration of how conservation science can be used to ameliorate that impact. Case studies are used to investigate such issues as deforestation, exotic species invasions, habitat fragmentation, endangered species protection, natural area management, and habitat restoration. Students examine critically the role of science in public policy decision-making as it relates to the protection of biodiversity in the United States. The course involves student-led discussions, guest speakers, field trips and independent research. Laboratory exercises explore the use of field techniques, GIS analysis, and population modeling as problem-solving tools in conservation biology. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 209. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 130.

BIOL 223     Genetics (Lab)  (4)

A study of fundamental principles of heredity including molecular aspects and evolutionary implications of these concepts. Prerequisite: BIOL 133.

BIOL 224     Genetics  (4)

A study of fundamental principles of heredity including molecular aspects and evolutionary implications of these concepts. Prerequisite: BIOL 133.

BIOL 229     Biology of Human Reproduction  (4)

This course focuses on understanding the complex mechanisms that allow life to create life. Primarily focusing on human reproduction, it ontogenetically tracks the progression from developing a sexual phenotype, attaining fertility, achieving fecundity, providing postnatal care, and senescence of fertility. This course integrates many biological fields including anatomy, physiology, endocrinology, neurology, cell biology, and behavioral studies to paint a comprehensive view of sexual reproduction. Prerequisite: BIOL 133.

BIOL 232     Human Health and the Environment (Lab)  (4)

A course integrating concepts in ecology and public health through the study of environmental threats to human health. Topics include population growth and food security, toxicity and toxins, food borne illness, emerging disease, waste and wastewater, air pollution and climate change. Students explore the interaction of poverty, environmental degradation and disease through projects examining local environmental health issues. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 130.

BIOL 233     Molecular Cell Biology  (4)

An extension of topics introduced in BIOL 133, this course is a study of the molecular and cellular basis of life, of the structure and function of cells, and of molecular genetics at an intermediate level. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed BIOL 321. Prerequisite: BIOL 133. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CHEM 120 or CHEM 150.

BIOL 236     Biochemistry  (4)

A one semester survey of biochemistry. The following topics will be addressed: biochemical primary literature and internet resources, bioenergetics, acid-base balance, protein structure and function, enzyme function and kinetics, metabolism, topics in physiological biochemistry, and topics in molecular biology. Non-laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 133 and CHEM 201.

BIOL 237     Freshwater Biology (Lab)  (4)

A study of the biology of freshwater ecosystems. Students examine interactions between freshwater species and their aquatic environments, as well as among one another, in the context of physical and chemical limitations associated with freshwater habitats. Laboratory emphasizes common techniques for inquiry, and a field research project is required. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 130.

BIOL 241     Rainforests and Coral Reefs  (2)

This course provides a fundamental understanding of the ecology and natural history of coral reef and tropical rainforest systems using Belize as a case study. Students examine specific environmental problems associated with these systems. Designed to be a companion to BIOL 251. BIOL 241 and BIOL 251 taken together count as one full lab course in biology. Prerequisite: Only open to students admitted to the Field Study in Belize program. Corequisite: BIOL 251.

BIOL 243     Molecular Methods (Lab)  (4)

This course focuses on close readings of the primary and secondary literature in the field of cellular and molecular biology. Experimental methodologies are a primary focus of this course as they pertain to design and analysis of techniques in the molecular biology field. Both in lecture and in laboratory, analysis of writing style and rationale for experimental design is evaluated. Prerequisite: BIOL 133 and (CHEM 120 or CHEM 150).

BIOL 250     Molecular Evolution  (4)

An examination of the evolution of nuclear, viral, and organellar genomes and of protein structure and function. Topics covered will include that origin of life, the evolution of globin and other families of proteins encoded by nuclear genes, evolution of mitochrondrial and chloroplast DNA, and molecular phylogenetic analysis. Use of computer algorithms for analyzing both nucleic acid and protein sequences will be introduced in the classroom. Non-laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 133.

BIOL 251     Field Study in Belize (Lab)  (2)

A field immersion into two of the most biologically diverse ecosystems on earth: coral reefs and tropical rainforests. Students live in remote field stations in Belize and explore the ecology and natural history of these two systems through field observation and research. BIOL 241 and BIOL 251 taken together count as one full lab course in biology. Prerequisite: Only open to students admitted to the Field Study in Belize program. Corequisite: BIOL 241.

BIOL 255     Herpetology (Lab)  (4)

A comprehensive examination of the diversity, ecology, and evolution of amphibians and reptiles. Students examine the systematics, biogeography, morphology, physiology, behavior, ecology, and conservation of amphibians and reptiles. Laboratory emphasizes survey and monitoring techniques. A field research project is required. Prerequisite: BIOL 130.

BIOL 260     Cave Biology  (4)

An examination of the biology of caves and other subterranean habitats. The course focuses on the structure and function of cave ecosystems and the evolutionary biology of cave animals. It also involves field trips to caves in the area. Prerequisite: BIOL 210 or BIOL 213.

BIOL 270     Human Anatomy (Lab)  (4)

This course focuses on basic anatomical structures of the human body and how distinct organ systems are organized at the tissue and cellular levels. Emphasis is placed on understanding structure-function relationships in the human body, how they interact in a network, and how those relationships are perturbed in the development of human disease. The laboratory component addresses practical considerations relating to anatomy and includes medical imaging technology emphasizing three-dimensional relationships. Prerequisite: BIOL 133.

BIOL 275     Histology and Microanatomy  (4)

This course provides a hands-on understanding of the structural and functional organization of animal tissues and organs at the cellular and subcellular levels. Students apply knowledge gained from lectures in interpreting and describing structures visualized in collecting, processing, and analyzing mouse tissues. Prerequisite: One course in biology and CHEM 120 or CHEM 150..

BIOL 280     Molecular Genetics (Lab)  (4)

Designed for students interested in molecular mechanisms by which cellular processes are controlled in eukaryotic cells. Topics include introduction to molecular genetic techniques and genomics, in-depth study of structures and chromosomes, transcriptional control of gene expression, signal transduction pathways relating to gene regulation, and abnormal regulatory processes that lead to disease. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 133.

BIOL 288     Biotechnology  (4)

This course provides an overview of technologies and methodologies used by biochemical engineers. It addresses topics such as how to manipulate DNA to produce genetically modified organisms, how to design viral based delivery systems for gene therapy, how to design a drug that targets a specific cell molecule, and how to determine protein interaction networks. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 289. Prerequisite: BIOL 133.

BIOL 289     Biotechnology (Lab)  (4)

This course provides an overview of technologies and methodologies used by biochemical engineers. It addresses topics such as how to manipulate DNA to produce genetically modified organisms, how to design viral based delivery systems for gene therapy, how to design a drug that targets a specific cell molecule, and how to determine protein interaction networks. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 288. Prerequisite: BIOL 133.

BIOL 300     Biology of Aging (Lab)  (4)

A study of the molecular and physiological processes that govern our longevity. This course integrates seminar and laboratory formats, using model organisms to examine the impact upon aging of dietary restriction, drugs that might induce longevity, genetics, and reproduction. Full use is made of relevant primary literature. Prerequisite: BIOL 233.

BIOL 302     Plant Growth and Development  (4)

A study of growth and developmental processes in plants, especially as they are influenced by environmental factors and by hormones or plant growth substances. Prerequisite: One college course in biology and CHEM 120.

BIOL 305     Plant Physiology  (4)

The principal functions of higher plants, including photosynthesis, gas exchange, water and solute relations and transport, mineral nutrition, plant hormone action, and environmental responses. Prerequisite: One college course in biology and CHEM 120.

BIOL 307     Mechanistic Biochemistry (Lab)  (4)

An examination of all aspects of protein science, including protein biosynthesis, protein structure, and the mechanisms of enzyme catalysis, with particular emphasis on the biochemistry of enzyme catalysis. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three and one-half hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 202.

BIOL 310     Plant Evolution and Systematics (Lab)  (4)

A comprehensive survey of trends in vascular plant diversity and the evolutionary mechanisms underlying these trends. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 130.

BIOL 311     Behavioral Ecology (Lab)  (4)

This course studies animal behavior from an ecological and evolutionary perspective. Topics include the development of behavior, predator-prey interactions, communication, foraging strategies, cooperation, mating behavior, and parental care. Lectures include discussions of the scientific literature. Laboratories emphasize methods used to study animal behavior, including hypothesis testing, experimental design, and statistical analysis. A research project is required. Laboratory course. BIOL 210 and BIOL 213 are recommended prerequisites but not required. Prerequisite: BIOL 130.

BIOL 312     General and Human Physiology  (4)

This course covers general physiological concepts such as homeostasis, control theory, and system analysis. It also takes a detailed view of how these general principles apply specifically to various physiological systems in humans and other mammals in some cases. Systems such as respiration, circulation, digestion, metabolism, thermoregulation, and excretion are studied at cellular, tissue and whole system levels. In cases where form is especially critical to function, anatomy is also covered, although there is no human dissection. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 314. Prerequisite: BIOL 233 and (CHEM 120 or CHEM 150).

BIOL 313     Ecosystems and Global Change (Lab)  (4)

A study of how the cycling of elements among the atmosphere, soil, water and living organisms sustains ecosystems, and how disruptions in these cycles, both natural and human-induced, bring about environmental change. In the field, students evaluate the sustainability of land use by quantifying elemental cycles in natural and human-altered ecosystems. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: One course in chemistry and one course in biology.

BIOL 314     General and Human Physiology (Lab)  (4)

This course covers general physiological concepts such as homeostasis, control theory, and system analysis. It also takes a detailed view of how these general principles apply specifically to the various physiological systems in humans and, in some cases, to other mammals. Systems such as respiration, circulation, digestion, metabolism, thermoregulation, and excretion are studied at cellular, tissue, and whole system levels. In cases where form is especially critical to function, anatomy is also covered although there is no human dissection. Laboratory course. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 312. Prerequisite: BIOL 233.

BIOL 315     Advanced Topics in Ecology and Biodiversity  (4)

A study of advanced topics in ecology and biodiversity, with an emphasis on integrating study of the scientific literature with field research. Open only to seniors pursuing majors in biology or ecology and biodiversity. Prerequisite: BIOL 210 or BIOL 211.

BIOL 316     Biochemistry of Metabolism and Molecular Biology (Lab)  (4)

A study of the biochemical reactions of eukaryotic cellular metabolism and bioenergetics, focusing on enzyme regulation and function, protein structure, nucleic acid structure and function, and selected topics in molecular biology and physiological biochemistry. Prior coursework in cell/molecular biology is recommended. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 233 and BIOL 243 and CHEM 202.

BIOL 318     Molecular Revolutions in Medicine  (4)

A survey of major molecular mechanisms of human disease, including approaches to diagnosing, preventing, treating, and curing disease conditions. This course features an overview of basic human genetics, an introduction to pharmacological methodologies in drug design and the FDA approval process and a survey of current technologies associated with gene therapy and stem cell treatments. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 328.

BIOL 319     Cancer Cell Biology (Lab)  (4)

This course is an overview of cancer development at the cellular and molecular levels. It uses a survey of primary scientific literature to cover the basic cell biology of cancer. Topics include growth control, angiogenesis, invasion, metabolism and cell signaling as they relate to the progress of cancer. Laboratory course. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 320. Prerequisite: BIOL 233.

BIOL 320     Cancer Cell Biology  (4)

This course is an overview of cancer development at the cellular and molecular levels. It uses a survey of primary scientific literature to cover the basic cell biology of cancer. Topics include growth control, angiogenesis, invasion, metabolism and cell signaling as they relate to the progress of cancer. Non-laboratory course. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 319. Prerequisite: BIOL 233.

BIOL 322     Genes and Behavior  (4)

This course focuses on our current understanding of how genes affect behavior and the interacting role of the environment. Topics include movement, foraging, social behaviors, and diseases of behavior. Lectures, including discussions of the scientific literature, focus on key issues and recent findings, as well as the experimental approaches used, in a range of animals including humans. Non-laboratory course. BIOL 213 and/or BIOL 301 are recommended but not required. Prerequisite: BIOL 130 and BIOL 133.

BIOL 323     Environment and Development  (4)

An integrative study of how environment affects development, with emphasis on underlying molecular and cell signaling pathways. The course explores links between environmental conditions during development and lifetime outcomes, such as reproductive success and disease risk. Discussions address implications for human health, ecosystem function, and evolutionary patterns. BIOL 233 is recommended but not required. Prerequisite: BIOL 133.

BIOL 324     Junior Seminar  (2)

A study of advanced topics in biology with emphasis critical evaluation of literature and writing. This course highlights important writing and research skills including literature searches, literature critique, and experimental design. Open only to juniors pursuing majors in biology.

BIOL 325     Biology of Aging  (4)

A study of the molecular and physiological processes that govern our longevity. Seminar course focused on a careful examination of the primary literature. Demonstrations using living animals illustrate the effects of dietary restriction, potential longevity-inducing drugs, genetics, and reproduction on aging. No laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 233 and (BIOL 223 or BIOL 224).

BIOL 328     Molecular Revolutions in Medicine (Lab)  (4)

A survey of major molecular mechanisms of human disease, which includes approaches to diagnose, prevent, treat, and cure disease conditions. This course covers an overview of basic human genetics, an introduction to pharmacological methodologies in drug design and FDA approved process, and an overview of current technologies involving gene therapy and stem cells. Laboratory course. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 318. Prerequisite: BIOL 233.

BIOL 330     Immunology (Lab)  (4)

An introduction to the vertebrate immune system with emphasis on molecular and cellular events. Topics include organization of the immune system, structure and function of immunoglobulins, genetics of immunoglobulin diversity, clonal selection theory, complement-mediated processes, the major histocompatibility complex, cell-mediated responses, immunization, innate immunity, autoimmunity, and immunodeficiency. Laboratory course. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 331. Prerequisite: BIOL 233 and BIOL 243.

BIOL 331     Immunology  (4)

An introduction to the vertebrate immune system with emphasis on molecular and cellular events. Topics include organization of the immune systems, structure and function of immunoglobulins, genetics of immunoglobulin diversity, clonal selection theory, complement-mediated processes, the major histocompatibility complex, cell-mediated responses, immunization, innate immunity, autoimmunity, and immunodeficiency. Non-laboratory course. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 330. Prerequisite: BIOL 233 and BIOL 243.

BIOL 333     Developmental Biology (Lab)  (4)

A study of animal development with an emphasis on gametogenesis, morphogenesis, and differentiation of the primary germ layers and their derivatives, as well as developmental mechanisms at cellular and subcellular levels. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 233 and (BIOL 223 or BIOL 224).

BIOL 334     Developmental Biology  (4)

A study of animal development with an emphasis on gametogenesis, morphogenesis, and differentiation of the primary germ layers and their derivatives, as well as developmental mechanisms at cellular and subcellular levels. Non-laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 233 and (BIOL 223 or BIOL 224).

BIOL 339     Studio Course in Microbiology  (4)

A survey of the structure and functions of bacteria and viruses with an emphasis on the characterization and classification, cultivation, reproduction and growth, chemical and physical control of growth, microbial metabolism, and microorganisms and disease. Other topics include microbiology of foods, soil, and wastewater. Short laboratory exercises on selected topics, such as gram staining, food microbiology, and water analysis, are conducted at the end of the appropriate lectures. Non-laboratory course. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 340. Prerequisite: BIOL 133 and (CHEM 120 or CHEM 150).

BIOL 340     Microbiology (Lab)  (4)

This survey of the structure and functions of bacteria/viruses and introduction to immunology will emphasize the characterization and classification, cultivation, reproduction and growth, chemical and physical control of growth, microbial metabolism, and microorganisms and disease. Other topics of discussion will include microbiology of foods, soil, and wastewater. Laboratory course. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 339. Prerequisite: BIOL 133 and (CHEM 120 or CHEM 150).

BIOL 350     Environmental Physiology and Biochemistry of Animals (Lab)  (4)

An examination of the interaction between an animal's environment and the animal's physiology and biochemistry. Of special interest is how environmental change causes short-term adaptation and long-term evolutionary change in physiological and biochemical traits. The types of such changes that take place, and the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for them, are studied through comparison of animals found in various moderate and extreme environments. Laboratory course. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 351. Prerequisite: BIOL 233.

BIOL 351     Environmental Physiology and Biochemistry of Animals  (4)

An examination of the interaction between an animal's environment and the animal's physiology and biochemistry. Of special interest is how environmental change causes short-term adaptation and long-term evolutionary change in physiological and biochemical traits. The types of such changes that take place, and the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for them, are studied through comparison of animals found in various moderate and extreme environments. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 350. Prerequisite: BIOL 233.

BIOL 380     Genomics  (4)

This course provides an introduction to the field of genomics. It aims to help students understand how genome-scale information (DNA sequences, genome variations, microarrays, and proteomics) can provide a systems biology perspective. Topics addressed include the structure of the human genome, strategies used to map and sequence the genome, and detailed examination of how genomic sequence information can be used in both laboratory and clinical settings.Non-laboratory course. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 381. Prerequisite: BIOL 223 or BIOL 224.

BIOL 381     Genomics (Lab)  (4)

This course provides an introduction to the field of genomics. It aims to help students understand how genome-scale information (DNA sequences, genome variations, microarrays, and proteomics) can provide a systems biology perspective. Topics addressed include the structure of the human genome, strategies used to map and sequence the genome, and detailed examination of how genomic sequence information can be used in both laboratory and clinical settings. The laboratory component offers students hands-on experience in running and analyzing their own DNA microarray. Laboratory course. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 380. Prerequisite: BIOL 223 or BIOL 224.

BIOL 388     Epigenetics  (4)

This course explores the field of epigenetics in a discussion-based format, using both primary and secondary scientific literature. Topics focus on cellular differentiation and pathologies derived from the misregulation of epigenetic systems in the cell, including imprinting during development and mutations involving DNA methylation of CpG islands during cancer progression. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 389. Prerequisite: BIOL 223 or BIOL 224 or BIOL 280.

BIOL 389     Epigenetics (Lab)  (4)

This course explores the field of epigenetics in a discussion-based format, using both primary and secondary scientific literature. Topics focus on cellular differentiation and pathologies derived from the misregulation of epigenetic systems in the cell, including imprinting during development and mutations involving DNA methylation of CpG islands during cancer progression. This course cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for BIOL 388. Prerequisite: BIOL 223 or BIOL 224 or BIOL 280.

BIOL 399     Special Topics  (2 or 4)

A seminar on a topic related to biology. May be repeated for credit when the topic differs. Prerequisite: BIOL 130 and BIOL 133.

BIOL 401     Biology Tutorial  (2)

Supervised study projects involving a topical survey of existing texts and/or periodical literature. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite: Professor consent and prerequisite override required.

BIOL 424     Senior Seminar  (2)

A study of advanced topics in biology with emphasis on critical evaluation of literature and speaking. Skills for oral communication are explored through multiple formats. Open only to seniors pursuing majors in biology. Prerequisite: BIOL 223 or BIOL 224.

BIOL 444     Independent Study  (2 or 4)

Supervised field or laboratory investigation. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite: Professor consent and prerequisite override required.

BIOL 490     Principles of Neuroscience  (4)

General neuroscience seminar: Lectures, readings and discussion of selected topics in neuroscience. Emphasis will be on how approaches at the molecular, cellular, physiological and organismal levels can lead to understanding of neuronal and brain function. No single individual may receive credit for both this course and either version of Neuropsychology at Sewanee (PSYC 254 and PSYC 255). Admission to the Sewanee-At-Yale Directed Research Program required. This course is only available through the Yale Directed Research Program.

BIOL 492     History of Modern Neuroscience  (4)

Survey of classical papers that have been the foundation for the rise of modern neuroscience since the 1950s. Areas covered range from genes and proteins through cells and systems to behavior. Classes combine overviews of different areas with discussions of selected classical papers. Emphasis is on how convergence of techniques, concepts, and personalities has been the basis for major advances. Admission to the Sewanee-At-Yale Directed Research Program required. This course only available through the Yale Directed Research Program. Prerequisite: PSYC 254.

BIOL 498     Research Methods Seminar  (4)

This seminar is organized around presentations of individual research projects, emphasizing detailed critique of project designs, findings, and conclusions. Students also review reports of empirical research written by other students in the seminar to develop their skills in both writing and critiquing research reports. Admission to the Sewanee-At-Yale Directed Research Program required. This course is only available through the Sewanee-At-Yale Directed Research Program. With the approval of program director and the biology department, this course may be listed as BIOL 498. Prerequisite: An introductory psychology or introductory biology course and approval of the Sewanee-at-Yale program director..

BIOL 499     Directed Research  (4)

Students conduct research under the direction of a faculty member on a topic of mutual interest. Typically culminates in a written research report. Admission to the Sewanee-At-Yale Directed Research Program required. This course is only available through the Sewanee-At-Yale Directed Research Program. With the approval of program director and the biology department, this course may be listed as BIOL 499.

Server Move Testing

Courselist Testing

Area Heading
BIOL 100
and BIOL 105
Biology and Human Affairs (Lab)
and Biology and People (Comment on the course for testing) 1
8
BIOL 107/109People and the Environment4
BIOL 113Great Ideas of Science4
or BIOL 114or Introduction to Botany
ABC 123Comment Course Title4
Select one of the following:4
Current Issues in Biology
The Human Mind: Artistic and Scientific Creativity
Total Semester Hours24

Plan of Study Testing

Freshman Year
AdventSemester Hours
BIOL 100
and BIOL 105
Biology and Human Affairs (Lab)
and Biology and People (Comment on the course for testing) 1
8
BIOL 107 or 109 People and the Environment
or Food and Hunger: Contemplation and Action
4
 Semester Hours12
Easter
BIOL 113 Great Ideas of Science 4
BIOL 114 Introduction to Botany 4
 Semester Hours8
Summer
BIOL 115 Conservation Biology 4
BIOL 118 Current Issues in Biology 4
 Semester Hours8
Sophomore Year
Advent
BIOL 119 The Human Mind: Artistic and Scientific Creativity 4
BIOL 130 Field Investigations in Biology 4
 Semester Hours8
Easter
BIOL 133 Introductory Molecular Biology and Genetics 4
BIOL 144 Directed Research 2-4
 Semester Hours6-8
Summer
BIOL 180 Principles of Human Nutrition 4
BIOL 200 Entomology 4
 Semester Hours8
 Total Semester Hours50-52

Course Block Testing

AMST 251     Black Masculinity in the United States  (4)

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of constructions of Black masculinity in the United States from the twentieth century through the present. Autobiographical accounts are used to examine historical and current definitions of Black manhood that challenge and reinforce understandings of what it means to be both Black and male.

AMST 255     Imagining Africa  (4)

This course examines popular notions of Africa and its relationship to a global African diaspora. Literature is used to question how Africa has served historically as a metaphor for exoticism, sexuality, and savagery in western discourse and, in the contemporary world, as an imagined site of seemingly insoluble problems such as genocide, famine, and the collapse of the state.

Inline Course Testing

Adding AMST 251 for testing.

Predefined Table Testing

Date Event
Bold Testing Bolded Information
Bullet Testing
  • Bullet 1
Email Testing leepfrog@leepfrog.com
URL Testing www.leepfrog.com
Inline Course testing AMST 150 for testing

Footnote Testing